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Posts tagged ‘Heinonen’

Iran: the 20-percent solution

By Olli J. Heinonen

By Olli Heinonen

In my January 11 article, “The 20 Percent Solution,” on the Foreign Policy magazine website, I wrote that Iran is on its way to becoming a virtual nuclear weapon state — a state that is putting the building blocks in place if it decides to manufacture a nuclear weapon. My analysis indicates that Iran may reach such a capability by 2013.

I suggested a way out from the stalemate in which Iran could convince the international community that its nuclear program will follow a peaceful track. This would include Iran suspending the production of enriched uranium and converting its existing 3.5 percent and 20 percent enriched uranium stocks, with the assistance of the international community, into fuel for the Tehran Research Reactor, as well as for another modern research reactor that could be provided to Iran. Read more

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After Fukushima: Seizing the chance to strengthen nuclear safety and security

Matthew Bunn

Matthew Bunn

By Matthew Bunn

Associate Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; co-principal investigator, Managing the Atom Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

Olli Heinonen and I have written a piece just out in Science (log in required) on nuclear safety and security in the aftermath of Fukushima.  We call for more stringent national regulations and international standards, expanded and strengthened safety and security peer reviews, and beefed-up emergency response. Read more

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How transparent is Iran’s nuclear transparency?

Olli J. Heinonen

Olli J. Heinonen

By Olli J. Heinonen

Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Every September, the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Board of Governors holds one of its four major annual Board meetings.  At each Board session, the item on Safeguards in Iran is on the agenda. The IAEA Board has just opened this week.

It has also become usual practice that prior to Board meetings, Iran attempts some gesture to show its willingness to cooperate – a gesture that on many past occasions had, sadly, been of form rather than substance. In August, Iran invited IAEA inspectors to visit some of its nuclear sites. Iranian officials have hailed this step as a badge of transparency in view of that fact that IAEA inspectors had in recent years  been barred (by Iran) from accessing two of the said sites. Read more

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The IAEA and the Nuclear Crisis at Fukushima

By Olli Heinonen

By Olli Heinonen

The Power & Policy Fellows’ Forum

By Olli Heinonen

Senior Fellow in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; former Deputy Director General, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and head of Department of Safeguards

As the human tragedy of the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan’s northeastern coast unfolds, Japan continues its battle to bring its nuclear power plant at Fukushima under control. For 10 days,  facility operators and technicians have worked tirelessly to cool the six stricken nuclear reactors and prevent a further spiral of fuel meltdown and release of harmful radioactivity. The work is being carried out under extremely difficult circumstances. Read more

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